102 Courses

+ What are the 102 Seminars?

First-year student 102 Seminars offer first- year students the opportunity to work with experienced faculty who are passionate and knowledgeable about the seminar topic. 102 seminars are introductory in the sense that little prior background is expected, yet they are real inquiries into the methods, components, and substance of a particular subject. In addition to developing meaningful bonds with faculty and peers, 102 seminars provide an intellectually exciting way of transitioning to the university. The learning outcomes for the First-year student 102 seminars are:

  • Improve critical thinking by developing evaluative, problem-solving, and expressive skills.
  • Enhance group communication skills through discussions, small-group work, presentations or debates.
  • Develop intellectual curiosity and better understand the role of a student in an academic community.

+ How to choose your 102 Seminar:

Although timing and your overall course schedule will influence your choice of seminars, you should use this class as an opportunity to develop your overall academic experience. When you register for your 102 seminar, you should consider a few things:

  • What are your academic interests?
  • Would you like to meet faculty from a specific academic discipline?
  • Do any of the seminar topics align with your research or career goals?
  • Do any of the seminar topics intrigue you?
  • Use this as an opportunity to explore an idea or project or topic.

+ What to expect from your 102 Seminar:

The 102 seminars will be different than most of the other classes in your schedule.  Seminars are meant to be small and interactive. 

  • Attendance is essential to your overall success
  • You will be expected to participate in discussions with your professor and the rest of the class
  • Your discussions will be based on assigned readings, movies or activities
  • You will be expected to share your opinions and questions about the seminar content

Please consider the above recommendations when selecting your First-year student 102 Seminar. Also, the most updated scheduling information is available via SOLAR for these classes.


Steve Marsh
Department: Theatre Arts

ACH 102.1: Script Development and Play Reading Workshop

Day/Time: Wednesday | 10:00AM-11:20AM
Location: Tabler Center Blackbox (110)
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: What is important to you and how can you express those ideas in dramatic form? Students will learn that there are many different dramatic forms through which ideas may be expressed. In this seminar we will pay special attention to the 10-Minute play format, which has become a staple of many regional theatre and playwriting organizations around the country. All students who participate in this workshop will share their ideas through writing plays.


Kristen Shorette
Department: Sociology

ACH 102.2: Food Systems in the US

Day/Time: Friday | 1:00PM-2:20PM
Location: SBS N405
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 25 to April 8)

Course Description: In this course we’ll take a critical look at the structures of food systems in the US and their effects on human health, labor, and the natural environment. We'll start with a look at how food is produced in the US. Next, we'll consider who works in the contemporary food system and what working conditions are like with a focus on farm work, meatpacking, retail, and restaurant work. We’ll then consider alternative approaches and possibilities for positive change. Class will be formatted as a combination of readings, documentaries, and discussions. Students will present a summary project on a related topic of their choice.


Troy Wolfskill
Department: Chemistry

ACH 102.3: The Literature of Hiking

Day/Time: Wednesday | 11:00AM-11:53AM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: This course will explore the literature of hiking, including both fiction and non-fiction, and spanning everything from Adventure Stories to Zoology. You will select an appropriate book to read and then prepare an oral presentation for your fellow students using PowerPoint or similar software. You will also explore the equipment needed for hiking by creating spreadsheets that list the gear essential to safe hiking and that help you to choose items based on cost, weight, durability and other factors. Hiking opportunities in the area will be explored, and a few hikes will be scheduled.


Cathy Marrone
Department: Sociology

ACH 102.4: Medicine and media

Day/Time: Friday | 2:30PM-3:50PM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: Two very powerful social institutions, Medicine and the Media have grown in prominence both apart, as well as alongside, one another in the US particularly as of late. Just think of the numerous television series and special feature films dedicated to physicians, addiction disorders, forensic pathology and even the numerous doctor-directed self-help shows set in an “almost” clinical talk show format. No matter whether in television, newsprint, documentaries, feature films or radio programs, it is clear the language of all that is medical is pervasive and persuasive both on a pure informational level as well as for our own entertainment. This seminar will create, a dialogue about the development of these institutions as mingled, as well as the consequences to the culture so clearly shaped with and by them.


Philip Baldwin
Department: Theater Arts

ACH 102.5: The Telepresent Self

Day/Time: Monday | 5:30PM-6:50PM
Location: Staller Center 3022
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: 1. Who, what, why, where, when, how, how much are you? Gather images of your grandparents and parents. Doctor them in Photoshop and ‘cartoonize’ programs. Start collective blog. Get/expand face book, flicker, you tube, second life, twitter, sketchup warehouse, and other select social media sites. Pose on some of these as another gender, race, class, nationality, or ghost/spirit/vampire/etc. Start comic life or comic book maker. Start your graphic novel. Collective topic: Vitalism contra Materialism. Keep a sketchbook. Open source software to download and to use: comic life, cartoonize, comic book creator, onyx, audacity, sketchup, blender, processing, open cobalt, open office, pure data, gimp, imovie, windows media maker, audacity, gamer, drammatica, and others.


Melissa Clarke
Department: Art

ACH 102.6: Creative Applications of Data and Systems in Art and Design

Day/Time: Tuesday | 5:30PM-6:23PM
Location: Tabler Center 104
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: In this class students will participate in class discussions covering the history and current use of diverse platforms that artists and designers employ to express research and data in art and design. From data visualizations to unique works of art, students will explore the growing world of information systems and data expression while planning their own physical output based on a topic of interest and their own research. Students will explore the application of emerging technologies and artistic mediums, including software, hardware and fabrication techniques, as well as alternative materials that may express best a chosen concept and narrative based on the information and data they select.


Gregory Ruf
Department: Asian and American Studies

ACH 102.7: Ethnographic Methods

Day/Time: Tuesday | 4:00PM-5:20PM
Location: Tabler Center 104
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: How do can one interpret and understand a foreign culture? What is it like to do long-term field research in another culture? This course offers an introduction to the techniques and challenges of participant-observation used by cultural anthropologists to conduct ethnographic research.


Nicholas Fisher
Department: School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences

ACH 102.8: Songs of Bob Dylan

Day/Time: Wednesday | 4:00PM-5:20PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: Students will get immersed in the songs of Bob Dylan, arguably one of the 20th Century's greatest and most influential artists. Students will be encouraged to interpret his songs. They will learn of the influences on Dylan's work and how he in turn has influenced music in the United States and elsewhere.


Elizabeth Bojsza
Department: Theatre Arts

ACH 102.9: Can Art Change the World?

Day/Time: Monday | 2:30PM-3:50PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course is a hands-on exploration of public art and art for social change including theatre, performance art, music, and visual art. Students will participate in exercises in class, investigate public art in the world, and be invited to plan and possibly create art themselves. No prior experience and/or talent is required-- all are welcome.


Susan Scheckel
Department: English

ACH 102.10: The Afterlives of Edgar Allan Poe

Day/Time: Tuesday | 11:30AM-12:50PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: In this course we will read some of the most engaging and influential of Edgar Allan Poe’s poetry and stories. We will also examine some of the many different cultural responses they have inspired—including paintings, films, graphic novels, comics, musical works, and television series. We will try to understand the power of Poe’s work and consider why Poe has had such a wide-ranging and forceful cultural resonance at different historical moments, including our own.


David Taylor
Department: Sustainability Studies

ACH 102.11: Creativity and the Artistic Impulse

Day/Time: Monday | 1:00PM-1:53PM
Location: Tabler Center 104
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: Creativity has long been something pointed to but rarely defined. This course will take both a historical and philosophical approach to understanding notions of creativity: 1. what is it? 2. how does it begin? 3. how does it manifest itself? 4. can it be nurtured? 5. how does it lead to product? 6. how has it been viewed, encouraged, or discouraged by various societies? The hope is students will further explore these questions in their particular field of art—visual, literary, film, or music. Students will work to produce a small project on some aspect of creativity.


Jessica J Mitchell
Department: Social Welfare

ACH 102.12: Women, Media and Politics

Day/Time: Tuesday | 2:30PM-3:50PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course will explore the role of women in American politics, elections and issue campaigns. We will begin with a historical overview of women’s participation, mobilization and activism in American politics and policy issues. Discussions will then focus on the cultural change women have brought to the political arena over the last 100 years and how the media covers women in politics


Clyde Miller
Department: Philosophy

ACH 102.13: Homer's Odyssey

Day/Time: Tuesday | 1:00PM-2:20PM
Location: Tabler Center 104
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: Students will read Homer's Odyssey in translation and examine film, comic book, and art interpretations to compare and enrich seeing and reading. Students will prepare answers to questions to discuss in groups each session. They will become acquainted with one of the classic heroes of Western literature and ideas. They will reflect on the ways in which Odysseus' desire and efforts to return home are to be found in contemporary life and experience and write at least two brief essays on the connections between Odysseus and themselves.


Ruth Kisch
Department: School of Professional Development

ACH 102.14: Telling A Story with Pictures: The Art of Comics

Day/Time: Wednesday | 2:30PM-3:50PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: Students will read two graphic novels, one from the manga tradition and one from the superhero genre. They will analyze and discuss the ways in which the images and words are combined . They will write at least two brief essays on the visual and narrative choices made by the creators of these two books.


Ruth Kisch
Department: School of Professional Development

ACH 102.15: Telling A Story with Pictures: The Art of Comics

Day/Time: Thursday | 11:30AM-12:50PM
Location: Tabler Center 104
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: Students will read two graphic novels, one from the manga tradition and one from the superhero genre. They will analyze and discuss the ways in which the images and words are combined . They will write at least two brief essays on the visual and narrative choices made by the creators of these two books.


Tracey Walters
Department: Africana Studies

ACH 102.16: Is Beyonce a Sexual Terrorist

Day/Time: Tuesday | 11:30AM-12:23PM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: Race and Representation: The Black Body in Media, Literature, and the Arts builds upon current conversations about the racialized and hyper-sexualized image of black female bodies in pop culture and how they are represented in the national imaginary. Feminist readings and cultural criticism show that racing and sexing the Black body has significant consequences for the Black community. Pop icons like Beyoncé and Nicki Minaj, along with celebrities from television shows, and unknown figures represented in visual art and media, serve as examples of how black women embrace their sexuality and promote sexual empowerment. Some argue that these women contribute to the denigrating image of the Black female body that promote the racist and sexist discourses that negatively impact the Black community. An important question for consideration is: are these women self-exploitative or sexually liberated?


Norman Prusslin
Department: Other

ACH 102.17: Rock and Roll and Its Influence on American Society and Culture

Day/Time: Thursday | 2:30PM-3:50PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: The class will examine the influence of the music of the rock and roll era ( 1950-present) on American society, culture, politics, fashion, religion and the popular arts. Discussion will focus on artists, songs, musical trends and styles. Video screenings, readings, group and individual projects will be component parts of the course experience.


Norman Prusslin
Department: Other

ACH 102.18: Rock and Roll and Its Influence on American Society and Culture

Day/Time: Thursday | 4:00PM-5:20PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: The class will examine the influence of the music of the rock and roll era ( 1950-present) on American society, culture, politics, fashion, religion and the popular arts. Discussion will focus on artists, songs, musical trends and styles. Video screenings, readings, group and individual projects will be component parts of the course experience.


Jessica J Mitchell
Department: Social Welfare

ACH 102.19: Women, Media and Politics

Day/Time: Tuesday | 4:00PM-5:20PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course will explore the role of women in American politics, elections and issue campaigns. We will begin with a historical overview of women’s participation, mobilization and activism in American politics and policy issues. Discussions will then focus on the cultural change women have brought to the political arena over the last 100 years and how the media covers women in politics.


Nicholas Wilson
Department: Sociology

ACH 102.20: The Sociology of Science Fiction

Day/Time: Wednesday | 8:30AM-9:50AM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: Lightsabers, warp drives, Klingons, oh my! Science fiction is appealing partly because it asks us to imagine living in worlds different from our own. But how do those societies actually work? This course examines classic and new science fiction (both written and filmed) to ask how science fiction illustrates aspects of the world we live in today--or the society we might become.