102 Courses

+ What are the 102 Seminars?

Freshman 102 Seminars offer first- year students the opportunity to work with experienced faculty who are passionate and knowledgeable about the seminar topic. 102 seminars are introductory in the sense that little prior background is expected, yet they are real inquiries into the methods, components, and substance of a particular subject. In addition to developing meaningful bonds with faculty and peers, 102 seminars provide an intellectually exciting way of transitioning to the university. The learning outcomes for the Freshman 102 seminars are:

  • Improve critical thinking by developing evaluative, problem-solving, and expressive skills.
  • Enhance group communication skills through discussions, small-group work, presentations or debates.
  • Develop intellectual curiosity and better understand the role of a student in an academic community.

+ How to choose your 102 Seminar:

Although timing and your overall course schedule will influence your choice of seminars, you should use this class as an opportunity to develop your overall academic experience. When you register for your 102 seminar, you should consider a few things:

  • What are your academic interests?
  • Would you like to meet faculty from a specific academic discipline?
  • Do any of the seminar topics align with your research or career goals?
  • Do any of the seminar topics intrigue you?
  • Use this as an opportunity to explore an idea or project or topic.

+ What to expect from your 102 Seminar:

The 102 seminars will be different than most of the other classes in your schedule.  Seminars are meant to be small and interactive. 

  • Attendance is essential to your overall success
  • You will be expected to participate in discussions with your professor and the rest of the class
  • Your discussions will be based on assigned readings, movies or activities
  • You will be expected to share your opinions and questions about the seminar content

Please consider the above recommendations when selecting your Freshman 102 Seminar. Also, the most updated scheduling information is available via SOLAR for these classes.


Kathryn Koshansky
Department: Athletic Training

HDV 102.1: When Opportunity Knocks..

Day/Time: Thursday | 11:30AM-12:50PM
Location: HDV Center 121
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course is designed to introduce students to unchartered waters. Opportunities are all around us and serve as great educational experiences. Begin building your resume by getting out of your "comfort zone" and "seize the moment"! Students will have the ability to explore themselves and find opportunities on and off campus.


Joanne Davila
Department: Psychology

HDV 102.2: The Science of Creating Healthy Relationships

Day/Time: Thursday | 5:30PM-6:50PM
Location: HDV Center 121
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course focuses on the science of romantic relationships, with an emphasis on how people can create healthy relationships. Students will learn about the major theories and models of relationship functioning, as well as the skills required to develop healthy relationships. Specific topics of focus will include knowing how to assess one’s relationship needs, selecting appropriate partners, understanding what makes a relationship work, making “stay or go” decisions in relationships, and coping with challenging relationship events, such as break-ups. The course is structured to provide an In-depth, interactive learning experience.


Deborah Firestone
Department: Health Science

HDV 102.3: Ethics and College Student Life

Day/Time: Wednesday | 4:00PM -5:20PM
Location: HDV Center 121
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course will use case studies of ethical dilemmas commonly faced by college students to challenge students to use critical thinking and problem-solving skills to recognize ethical issues, build understanding and work toward the resolution of ethical problems. An examination of common ethical problems will provide a framework within which students can develop their own code of ethics.


Jeanine Engelmann
Department: Athletic Training

HDV 102.4: Injuries and Medical Conditions in the Physically Active

Day/Time: Tuesday | 2:30PM-3:50PM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: An introduction to common injuries and medical conditions that occur in the physically active population. Topics include soft tissue injury, fractures and dislocations, cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, and adolescent & aging populations.


Stephen A. Shultz
Department: Journalism

HDV 102.5: Making Decisions

Day/Time: Monday | 1:00PM-2:20PM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: Even if we don’t realize it, we make decisions throughout each and every day! Sometimes the choices are simple and we really don’t think much, if at all, about them. At other times, we are faced with situations that do not provide clear choices, even though these very decisions may have a great impact on our lives. This course in decision making will be multidisciplinary as it will examine decisions that are made regarding a variety of problems and issues as they appear in history, literature and current affairs. These examples will be used as a bridge to the decisions that students will need to make in their own lives. Participants will examine factors that play a role in decision making and be encouraged to make applications to their own lives and situations. By the end of the course, students will develop a practical guideline that will be useful both now and for the rest of their lives. Suggestions from students as to discussions and topics are additionally encouraged and welcome.


Chris Filstrup
Department: Other

HDV 102.6: Varieties of religion: describing ourselves and others

Day/Time: Friday | 2:30PM-3:50PM
Location: Melville Library N3090
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: What does it mean to be religious? Is it a matter of affiliation to an organization? Belonging to a group? A certain way of thinking? Intense feelings? A distinct set of moral guidelines? A set of practices? Is there a difference between being spiritual and being religious? What does God have to do with it? This course will investigate these and other questions through class discussion, presentations by and Q&A with campus and community religious leaders, and some reading. Active class participation will determine 60% of the final grade.


David Kahn
Department: CESAME

HDV 102.7: Understanding personal finance

Day/Time: Wednesday | 12:00PM-12:53PM
Location: HDV Center 121
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: You will be introduced to aspects of finance that will prove useful in their careers. You will learn about the financial markets, investments, financial planning, managing your money, and debt. Class participation will be a significant and fun part of your grade!


Nancy Amoia
Department: General Dentistry

HDV 102.8: Dental Health and Your Body

Day/Time: Thursday | 4:00PM-5:20PM
Location: HDV Center 121
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course is divided into three areas in order to explore the connection between dental health and your body: 1) Preventive Dental Care: Evaluating Human Tooth Morphology and various influence that effect the dentitio, (2) The Mouth-Body Connection, and (3) Social Habits and How They Affect the Oral Cavity.


John Foti Jr
Department: General Dentistry

HDV 102.8: Dental Health and Your Body

Day/Time: Thursday | 4:00PM-5:20PM
Location: HDV Center 121
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course is divided into three areas in order to explore the connection between dental health and your body: 1) Preventive Dental Care: Evaluating Human Tooth Morphology and various influence that effect the dentitio, (2) The Mouth-Body Connection, and (3) Social Habits and How They Affect the Oral Cavity.


Bonnie Lipow
Department: General Dentistry

HDV 102.8: Dental Health and Your Body

Day/Time: Thursday | 4:00PM-5:20PM
Location: HDV Center 121
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course is divided into three areas in order to explore the connection between dental health and your body: 1) Preventive Dental Care: Evaluating Human Tooth Morphology and various influence that effect the dentitio, (2) The Mouth-Body Connection, and (3) Social Habits and How They Affect the Oral Cavity.


William Stanley
Department: Health Science

HDV 102.9: There is No Silver Bullet: Advanced Medical Imaging

Day/Time: Tuesday | 1:00PM-2:20PM
Location: HDV Center 121
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: A variety of medical imaging technologies have been developed since the discovery of x-rays a little over 100 years ago. Through this seminar, students will have a better understanding of the science behind these different technologies, the role each medical imaging modality plays in the lives of patients, as well as the contribution of medical imaging to the greater healthcare system. Case studies will be reviewed with the class.


Jessica Curran
Department: English

HDV 102.10: Yoga for Academic Wellness

Day/Time: Monday | 1:00PM-2:20PM
Location: Roth Cafe 122
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: More and more, current research supports the idea that yoga and meditation are really good for us. What is so good about them and how do they apply to real life? The ancient meditation and mindfulness practice of hatha yoga harbors a rich intellectual tradition, while offering highly practical tools for engaging with many of the problems that affect students today, including stress, anxiety, time management, and more personal challenges, such as how to balance conflicting sides of an individual’s identity. This class will explore the philosophical, physical, and meditative qualities of yoga, while encouraging balance, flexibility, inner strength, breath awareness, and concentration. Development of these skills can provide a highly accessible and practical path to becoming a more grounded, healthy, and successful student. Each session will include a gentle hatha yoga practice, adaptable to all students, followed by a group discussion of related readings on yogic philosophy and poetry. Students should come to each session prepared with a yoga mat and comfortable clothes.


Jessica Curran
Department: English

HDV 102.11: Yoga for Academic Wellness

Day/Time: Monday | 2:30PM-4:00PM
Location: Roth Cafe 122
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: More and more, current research supports the idea that yoga and meditation are really good for us. What is so good about them and how do they apply to real life? The ancient meditation and mindfulness practice of hatha yoga harbors a rich intellectual tradition, while offering highly practical tools for engaging with many of the problems that affect students today, including stress, anxiety, time management, and more personal challenges, such as how to balance conflicting sides of an individual’s identity. This class will explore the philosophical, physical, and meditative qualities of yoga, while encouraging balance, flexibility, inner strength, breath awareness, and concentration. Development of these skills can provide a highly accessible and practical path to becoming a more grounded, healthy, and successful student. Each session will include a gentle hatha yoga practice, adaptable to all students, followed by a group discussion of related readings on yogic philosophy and poetry. Students should come to each session prepared with a yoga mat and comfortable clothes. .


Jeannie Guglielmo
Department: Clinical Laboratory Sciences

HDV 102.12: Forensic Science Chronicles- Lessons Learned

Day/Time: Friday | 2:30PM-3:50PM
Location: HDV Center 121
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course will introduce students to some of the specialities within the broad definition of Forensic Science including: criminalistics, crime scene analysis, physical evidence, instrumentation, drug analysis, and biological sciences. The instructor will present topics relevant to students and explore how real life cases from personal experience provide insight into making the participant more "street-wise" and aware of their surroundings. The class will incorporate current cases when applicable. The student will not only learn about the field of Forensic Science and its potential career aspects, but also take with them valuable life long leassons for personal protection and for some day sevring as a welll educated juror.


Kathleen McGoldrick
Department: Health Science

HDV 102.13: The Changing Culture of Food in America

Day/Time: Tuesday | 10:00AM-11:20AM
Location: HDV Center 121
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: The more Americans worry about nutrition, the less healthy we have become. This course will discuss the emergence of the modern Western diet and how the science of food has significantly changed the culture of food in our nation. Students will examine the changes in diet over the past decades and how our focus on nutrients and nutritional value has contributed to a diet rich in manufactured food. Students will have an opportunity to examine their own eating habits and the influence of family on their food culture. Additionally we will explore current trends in local food sourcing and a return to eating Food.


Sharon Cuff
Department: Health Science

HDV 102.14: Eight Stages of Life

Day/Time: Monday | 5:30PM-6:50PM
Location: HDV Center 121
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course will provide students with an introduction to the eight stages of life according to Erik Erikson. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to identify the eight stages of life, list the major tasks in each stage, and analyze information from an interview to present to the class. The course will include lecture, small group work, and in-class activities to support the learning objectives.


Sharon Cuff
Department: Health Science

HDV 102.15: Exploring Local Foods

Day/Time: Wednesday | 5:30PM-6:50PM
Location: HDV Center 121
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: Our food, its origins and its path to reach us, plays a critical role in sustaining the planet. This course will discuss the ways in which our food is grown, distributed, and sold and the impact we can have on the future of feeding our growing population. Students will examine the journey of food from large agribusinesses to grocery stores to consumers. Students will have an opportunity to contrast the benefits of locally grown food with large scale operations. Each student will track individual food purchases at some point in the semester.


Lori Escallier
Department: Nursing

HDV 102.16: Hot Topics in Health and the Human Person

Day/Time: Monday | 2:30PM-3:50PM
Location: HSC 239
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course will address current hot topics in the study of health and the human person. We will explore various topics that impact all aspects of health and well-being and will apply health principles and research findings to promote health outcomes. Students will have the opportunity to visit the School of Nursing lab and use simulation experiences.


Patricia Martin
Department: Health Science

HDV 102.17: Perception's Role in Communication

Day/Time: Thursday | 2:30PM-3:50PM
Location: HDV Center 121
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: Did I just hear what I think I heard? Did I just see what I think I saw? From first impressions to lasting relationships, our perception of what is going on around us has a tremendous impact on our communication skill and effectiveness. Here, we’ll discuss the basics of perception as it applies to communication, common and not so common behaviors that lead to misperceptions, why differences in perception occur, and how media affects our perception. Then we’ll figure out ways to be more accurate and discerning when deciding what’s happening in our lives.


Norman Goodman
Department: Sociology

HDV 102.18: Identity

Day/Time: Wednesday | 2:30PM-3:23PM
Location: SBS N403
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: The course will deal with how we establish, maintain, and change our sense of identity throughout life. It will draw upon social psychological theory and research. Students will be expected to be active participants in discussing the issues involved.


Donna Crapanzano
Department: Health Science

HDV 102.19: Food Insecurity on College Campuses

Day/Time: Tuesday | 11:30AM-12:23PM
Location: HDV Center 121
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: Food insecurity can be defined as not having at all times an adequate amount of food to meet nutritional and health needs (United States Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service, 2015a). It is not generally thought of as a problem on college campuses, perhaps because higher education is viewed as a luxury available for those who can afford it, rather than as a necessity for success in modern America (Cady, 2014). The problem of food insecurity on college campuses is beginning to be recognized, as shown by the creation of the College and University Food Bank Alliance (CUFBA) (College and University Food Bank Alliance, 2016). This coincides with the creation, in 2013, of the Stony Brook University food pantry (SBUFP), its inclusion in the CUFBA (McGloin, 2015), and SBU’s participation in CUFBA’s 2016 nationwide survey of food insecurity on college campuses.


Sangeet Honey
Department: Molecular Genetics and Microbiology

HDV 102.20: Emerging Infectious Diseases

Day/Time: Thursday | 1:00PM-2:20PM
Location: Life Sciences 58
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: Microorganisms are omnipresent. Human beings live in a delicate balance with microbes. In this seminar course, we will discuss a number of factors, including international travel, economic development, and human behavior that can perturb this balance and contribute to the emergence and re-emergence of several infectious diseases.


Pamela Linden
Department: Occupational Therapy

HDV 102.21: Animal Assisted Interventions and Health

Day/Time: Monday | 7:00PM-8:20PM
Location: HDV Center 121
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)
Special Notes: I would like to bring certified, trained and insured PRAAT therapy dogs in to the classroom. As per SBU policy, this will be cleared through CAPS.

Course Description: This course is designed to introduce you to Animal Assisted Interventions in Health (AAI). This course will teach you about the history of AAI and the goals and techniques used with animals to enhance human physical, social, spiritual and mental health. You will gain awareness of the many diverse roles and functions that animals may have (service dogs, emotional support animals, therapy dogs, horses and farm animals). You will explore the many applications, ethical considerations, and potential consequences of incorporating AAI into healthcare and human services treatment environments.


Gregory Ruf
Department: Asian and American Studies

HDV 102.22: Iron Men in Wooden Boats: A History of Whaling in America

Day/Time: Wednesday | 8:30AM-9:50AM
Location: GLS Center 109
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course explores the history of whaling in America, from the 1600s through its heyday in the mid-1800s, to its demise in the early twentieth century. It examines the social and economic history of the industry, the technologies it deployed, and its complex organization of labor both at sea and on-shore.


Linda Cimino
Department: Anesthesiology

HDV 102.23: Survival of the Fittest

Day/Time: Monday | 1:00PM-2:20PM
Location: HSC CR 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: DIVERSITY usually centers on ethnicity, gender and culture. The most important, and usually overlooked dimension of Diversity in the classroom, is that of LEARNING. Education research reveals that there is a direct link between knowing yourself as a Learner and success in learning, retaining and applying new and difficult information. Through a computer-based survey, this Seminar will validate YOUR unique LEARNING STYLE. The class will interpret, summarize and integrate results to create the Seminar's Learning Style composite. Learners will evaluate their current study habits and determine if these habits are producing the maximum return of investment – deeper understanding of course work and great grades! Efficient, effective learning, test taking, and project process are explored utilizing examples from seminar participant coursework. Recognition and accommodation of individual and group learning preferences will frame course content delivery throughout this interactive seminar.


Linda Cimino
Department: Anesthesiology

HDV 102.24: Survival of the Fittest

Day/Time: Thursday | 11:30AM-12:50PM
Location: HSC Seminar 1B
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: DIVERSITY usually centers on ethnicity, gender and culture. The most important, and usually overlooked dimension of Diversity in the classroom, is that of LEARNING. Education research reveals that there is a direct link between knowing yourself as a Learner and success in learning, retaining and applying new and difficult information. Through a computer-based survey, this Seminar will validate YOUR unique LEARNING STYLE. The class will interpret, summarize and integrate results to create the Seminar's Learning Style composite. Learners will evaluate their current study habits and determine if these habits are producing the maximum return of investment – deeper understanding of course work and great grades! Efficient, effective learning, test taking, and project process are explored utilizing examples from seminar participant coursework. Recognition and accommodation of individual and group learning preferences will frame course content delivery throughout this interactive seminar.