102 Courses

+ What are the 102 Seminars?

Freshman 102 Seminars offer first- year students the opportunity to work with experienced faculty who are passionate and knowledgeable about the seminar topic. 102 seminars are introductory in the sense that little prior background is expected, yet they are real inquiries into the methods, components, and substance of a particular subject. In addition to developing meaningful bonds with faculty and peers, 102 seminars provide an intellectually exciting way of transitioning to the university. The learning outcomes for the Freshman 102 seminars are:

  • Improve critical thinking by developing evaluative, problem-solving, and expressive skills.
  • Enhance group communication skills through discussions, small-group work, presentations or debates.
  • Develop intellectual curiosity and better understand the role of a student in an academic community.

+ How to choose your 102 Seminar:

Although timing and your overall course schedule will influence your choice of seminars, you should use this class as an opportunity to develop your overall academic experience. When you register for your 102 seminar, you should consider a few things:

  • What are your academic interests?
  • Would you like to meet faculty from a specific academic discipline?
  • Do any of the seminar topics align with your research or career goals?
  • Do any of the seminar topics intrigue you?
  • Use this as an opportunity to explore an idea or project or topic.

+ What to expect from your 102 Seminar:

The 102 seminars will be different than most of the other classes in your schedule.  Seminars are meant to be small and interactive. 

  • Attendance is essential to your overall success
  • You will be expected to participate in discussions with your professor and the rest of the class
  • Your discussions will be based on assigned readings, movies or activities
  • You will be expected to share your opinions and questions about the seminar content

Please consider the above recommendations when selecting your Freshman 102 Seminar. Also, the most updated scheduling information is available via SOLAR for these classes.


Stefan Judex
Department: Biomedical Engineering

ITS 102.1: Biomedical Research: the Long Way from Idea to Publication

Day/Time: Tuesday | 5:30PM-6:50PM
Location: ITS Center A003
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: Biomedical research has a powerful impact on health and well-being of our society. Generally, the public takes medical progress for granted but most know very little about the processes that facilitate research at universities. In this seminar, we will explore what it takes to move an idea, or scientific hypothesis, from its initial stages to testing it in the laboratory to ultimately publishing in a peer-reviewed journal.


Richard McKenna
Department: Computer Science

ITS 102.2: 3D Modeling for Games

Day/Time: Tuesday | 10:00AM-11:20AM
Location: Computer Science 2129
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course will examine the tools and techniques used for creating animated, textured, 3D models via modeling software. Students in this course will do hands-on exercises using modeling tools and will create their own animated characters using Blender3D.


Richard McKenna
Department: Computer Science

ITS 102.3: 3D Modeling for Games

Day/Time: Thursday | 10:00AM-11:20AM
Location: Computer Science 2129
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course will examine the tools and techniques used for creating animated, textured, 3D models via modeling software. Students in this course will do hands-on exercises using modeling tools and will create their own animated characters using Blender3D.


Imin Kao
Department: Mechanical Engineering

ITS 102.4: Energy and Technology

Day/Time: Friday | 10:00AM - 10:53AM
Location: Engineering Building 112
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: In this ITS102 course, students will have an opportunity to conduct research and perform analysis on various topics of energy and technology. This will be a guided study in which you will interact with the professor directly to choose the topic, conduct study and literature survey, and put together a professional presentation on the topic of your choice. Issues and case studies include topics in "Energy and Technology" pertaining to: environment, daily life, transportation, power plant, energy production, energy consumption, reserve on earth, carbon sequestration, drinking water, biosystem, biodiversity, … etc. Students are expected to produce and document a video podcast presentation, as the term project, and to present the research finding on a chosen topic.


Vivek Yadav
Department: Mechanical Engineering

ITS 102.5: Applying engineering principles to study humans behavior

Day/Time: Monday | 4:00PM-4:53PM
Location: ITS Center A003
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: Students will learn how engineering principles can be applied to study various human behaviors, ranging from movements to emotional response to cognition.


Lori Scarlatos
Department: Technology and Society

ITS 102.6: Gamification

Day/Time: Monday | 11:00AM-11:53AM
Location: SBS N620
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: Gamification incorporates game mechanics into non-game contexts, to make them more fun and engaging. This technique is currently being used in a wide range of applications, including commerce, marketing, education, health, and government. Students will learn how gamification works, and how to apply it to their own areas of interest.


Lori Scarlatos
Department: Technology and Society

ITS 102.7: Somewhere Over the Rainbow: Color in Art and Technology

Day/Time: Wednesday | 10:00AM-10:53AM
Location: CS 2205
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: This course explores color from a variety of perspectives, from literature film and art to science and technology. Topics include color symbolism; color harmonies; simultaneous contrast; colorscripts; color systems and models; chromadepth. Students are not expected to be artists or technologists, though all are welcome. Over the semester, students will develop an ePortfolio showcasing their explorations in color.


Gary Halada
Department: Materials Science and Engineering

ITS 102.8: Transformative Technologies: Fact and Fiction

Day/Time: Monday | 2:30PM-3:50PM
Location: ITS Center A003
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: Transformative and disruptive technologies, such as semiconductor electronics and atomic power, have changed our world, as well as led to both utopian and dystopian visions (often expressed in literature and film). We will discuss one or more emerging disruptive technologies (e.g. nanotechnology, artificial life, programmable matter), and how popular media reflect the public’s perception of risk. We will also discuss the real engineering behind these technologies, and how the engineer’s determination of risk may differ from the public perception of risk, and what impact that has on development and use of new technologies. Students will also have opportunity to read and write a little science fiction, expressing what they have learned.


Gary Halada
Department: Materials Science and Engineering

ITS 102.9: Transformative Technologies: Fact and Fiction

Day/Time: Wednesday | 2:30PM-3:50PM
Location: ITS Center A003
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: Transformative and disruptive technologies, such as semiconductor electronics and atomic power, have changed our world, as well as led to both utopian and dystopian visions (often expressed in literature and film). We will discuss one or more emerging disruptive technologies (e.g. nanotechnology, artificial life, programmable matter), and how popular media reflect the public’s perception of risk. We will also discuss the real engineering behind these technologies, and how the engineer’s determination of risk may differ from the public perception of risk, and what impact that has on development and use of new technologies. Students will also have opportunity to read and write a little science fiction, expressing what they have learned.


Melissa Clarke
Department: Art

ITS 102.10: Creative Applications of Data and Systems in Art and Design

Day/Time: Thursday | 5:30PM-6:23PM
Location: ITS Center A003
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: In this class students will participate in class discussions covering the history and current use of diverse platforms that artists and designers employ to express research and data in art and design. From data visualizations to unique works of art, students will explore the growing world of information systems and data expression while planning their own physical output based on a topic of interest and their own research. Students will explore the application of emerging technologies and artistic mediums, including software, hardware and fabrication techniques, as well as alternative materials that may express best a chosen concept and narrative based on the information and data they select.


Christine Veloso
Department: Technology and Society

ITS 102.12: Diversity and Inclusion in STEM: The key to Innovation

Day/Time: Thursday | 4:00PM-4:53PM
Location: ITS Center A04
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: It is well documented that certain populations (e.g. women and minorities) are underrepresented in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). Through this course we will explore the possible origins behind these discrepancies, in addition to ways in which diversity within STEM can be improved.


Ronald Feinberg
Department: College of Business

ITS 102.13: The US Constitution and Social Media: Protecting Our Rights

Day/Time: Wednesday | 7:00PM-8:20PM
Location: ITS Center A003
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: The First Amendment and the Fourth Amendment of the United States Constitution. Freedom of speech, the right of privacy, protection from unreasonable searches. What happens to these legal rights when you use Facebook, YouTube, Linkedin and Twitter? Is your personal information now public information? Can you lose your job for expressing your personal opinion on social media? Do college admissions counselors and employment recruiters base their decisions on your personal profiles available on social media? In this course we will explore different legal cases involving the use of various social media and the application of our Constitutional rights. We will work individually and in groups to analyze several cases and debate the merits of the opposing sides the issues.


Phillip Baldwin
Department: Theater Arts

ITS 102.14: Transmedia Performance and Exhibition

Day/Time: Tuesday | 11:30AM-12:50PM
Location: Harriman 115
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This is a critical/lab class that examines the hybrid and mashup cultures of transmedia everywhere. From the dance club with dj/vj use, to the use of the media performance and installation the student will examine how media has intersected all forms of ‘narratology’ and expression. The student will work with over twenty different open source (exploring the open source mashup culture will be part of the agenda) programs on various devices including the smart phone, the ipad and tablets, laptops, kinect interaction and the neurosensor to create a larger SBU and NYC based exhibition and performance piece working with musicians, performers and dance/movement people.


Kevin Moriarty
Department: Technology and Society

ITS 102.15: Technology Innovation

Day/Time: Tuesday | 10:00AM-11:20AM
Location: ITS Center A003
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course will investigate current events in technology. The topics will include; (1) The areas of technology in society, (2) An assessment of the affects of the technology in our society. (3) The management and control of the technology , either by government (laws, & regulations), industry (specifications, & standards) or businesses (patents, trade secrets & licenses).


Yuefan Deng
Department: Applied Math and Statistics

ITS 102.16: Supercomputing

Day/Time: Tuesday | 11:30AM-12:50PM
Location: ITS Center A003
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: We will introduce the latest development of the state-of-the-art supercomputers and their application in science and engineering.


Anurag Purwar
Department: Mechanical Engineering

ITS 102.17: Learning to Design Robots and Machines

Day/Time: Tuesday | 1:00PM-2:20PM
Location: Harriman Hall 320
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 25 to April 8)

Course Description: Today, we are at the cusp of a major robotics and physical computing trend made possible by the ubiquity of cheap computers and open source movement in both hardware and software. In this class, we will learn fundamentals of designing and prototyping robots and machines that interact with the environment and execute motions that are either useful or entertaining. This will be enabled using an open source programmable microcontroller and physical computing platform -- that can take input from a range of sensors and actuate outputs. We will also learn about different sensors that can detect light, touch, sound, etc. and how the information gained from them can be processed to effect outputs using motors, lights, and other actuators. The class is at a beginner level and meant not only for science and engineering students, but also for students from arts with an interest in imparting their creations a "moving" element.


Michael Tashbook
Department: Computer Science

ITS 102.18: The Algorithms That Run the World

Day/Time: Wednesday | 4:00PM-4:53PM
Location: ITS Center A003
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: How do search engines like Google work? How do we securely transmit information across the Internet? How do they create CGI special effects in movies? How does data compression work? In this course, we will examine the inner workings of some of the computer algorithms that lurk in the background of our everyday activities. We will also examine the potential impact of these algorithms on our daily lives. No prior computer science or programming background is required.


Y. Annie Liu
Department: Computer Science

ITS 102.19: What's Logical

Day/Time: Thursday | 10:00AM-11:20AM
Location: Computer Science 115
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course introduces students to well-known interesting problems and logical puzzles. In addition to solving the puzzles and problems, we also discuss their implications and applications. Knowledge of basic algebra in middle school and high school is required.


David Tonjes
Department: Technology and Society

ITS 102.20: Garbage in Your World

Day/Time: Friday | 11:00AM-11:53AM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: We will look at the kind of garbage we make, in particular here on campus. Many people draw conclusions about the very nature of our society from our garbage, and we will look at some of those points of view. The class will explore some of the ways we currently manage our wastes, and examine some alternatives that may lead to entirely different approaches to materials use. The potential for such changes to lead to a more “sustainable” way of life will be discussed.


Ridha Kamoua
Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering

ITS 102.21: From Microelectronics to Nanoelectronics

Day/Time: Wednesday | 10:00AM-10:53AM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: Since the early days of microelectronics, there was a drive to build more complex and faster circuits and systems in a chip. According to Moore’s Law, circuit complexity (roughly the number of transistors) and computer performance doubles every 24 months. This has been achieved mainly by scaling down the dimensions of the building blocks (MOS transistors) from several microns to about 0.014 microns or 14 nm (nanometer) at present. At this scale, new physical effects start to manifest themselves and change the behavior of conventional devices. According to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), scaling down of MOSFETs will encounter major challenges around 2020. Therefore new technologies are being considered. Among these, nanotechnology is emerging as a strong contender. Nanotechnology refers to the processes, materials, and device structures used to build transistors or circuit elements that are smaller than 100 nanometers (nm) in size. This course will give a general overview of microelectronics, describe the challenges faced, and introduce a number of novel nanoscale devices being pursued such as single electron transistors, resonant tunneling devices, carbon nanotube transistors, molecular transistors, and graphene transistors.


Wei Rubenstein
Department: Biomedical Engineering

ITS 102.22: Technology and Biomedical Research

Day/Time: Thursday | 11:30AM-12:50PM
Location: ITS Center A003
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: An introduction to biomedical engineering research and an overview on how technology development affected biomedical research. Various standard techniques will be introduced; topics on trends in new biotechnology, health care needs, and biomedical research needs, will also be discussed.


Jay Mendelson
Department: Mechanical Engineering

ITS 102.23: Product Design

Day/Time: Monday | 12:00PM-12:53PM
Location: ITS Center A003
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: This course will introduce students to the methodology of product design used in consumer and industrial products. Students will learn about product design through class lectures and by creating their own design concept based on market research. They will present their design concepts to their peers in the class. Topics will include: ● Determining user needs through environment and voice of customer studies ● Creating a design proposal to convert those needs to a product design ● Writing a comprehensive product design specification. ● Fostering creativity and evaluating design concepts. ● Using analytical tools for executing a design. ● Preparing written and oral presentations to sell a proposal to management. Students will be expected to use the software tools in their projects: ● Microsoft Excel for creating a marketing requirements spec and providing economic justification. ● Microsoft Word for creating a product design spec. ● Microsoft Power Point for creating a written project proposal and making an oral presentation. ● All three tools for documenting a design concept.


Jay Mendelson
Department: Mechanical Engineering

ITS 102.24: Product Design

Day/Time: Wednesday | 12:00PM-12:53PM
Location: ITS Center A003
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: This course will introduce students to the methodology of product design used in consumer and industrial products. Students will learn about product design through class lectures and by creating their own design concept based on market research. They will present their design concepts to their peers in the class. Topics will include: ● Determining user needs through environment and voice of customer studies ● Creating a design proposal to convert those needs to a product design ● Writing a comprehensive product design specification. ● Fostering creativity and evaluating design concepts. ● Using analytical tools for executing a design. ● Preparing written and oral presentations to sell a proposal to management. Students will be expected to use the software tools in their projects: ● Microsoft Excel for creating a marketing requirements spec and providing economic justification. ● Microsoft Word for creating a product design spec. ● Microsoft Power Point for creating a written project proposal and making an oral presentation. ● All three tools for documenting a design concept.