102 Courses

+ What are the 102 Seminars?

Freshman 102 Seminars offer first- year students the opportunity to work with experienced faculty who are passionate and knowledgeable about the seminar topic. 102 seminars are introductory in the sense that little prior background is expected, yet they are real inquiries into the methods, components, and substance of a particular subject. In addition to developing meaningful bonds with faculty and peers, 102 seminars provide an intellectually exciting way of transitioning to the university. The learning outcomes for the Freshman 102 seminars are:

  • Improve critical thinking by developing evaluative, problem-solving, and expressive skills.
  • Enhance group communication skills through discussions, small-group work, presentations or debates.
  • Develop intellectual curiosity and better understand the role of a student in an academic community.

+ How to choose your 102 Seminar:

Although timing and your overall course schedule will influence your choice of seminars, you should use this class as an opportunity to develop your overall academic experience. When you register for your 102 seminar, you should consider a few things:

  • What are your academic interests?
  • Would you like to meet faculty from a specific academic discipline?
  • Do any of the seminar topics align with your research or career goals?
  • Do any of the seminar topics intrigue you?
  • Use this as an opportunity to explore an idea or project or topic.

+ What to expect from your 102 Seminar:

The 102 seminars will be different than most of the other classes in your schedule.  Seminars are meant to be small and interactive. 

  • Attendance is essential to your overall success
  • You will be expected to participate in discussions with your professor and the rest of the class
  • Your discussions will be based on assigned readings, movies or activities
  • You will be expected to share your opinions and questions about the seminar content

Please consider the above recommendations when selecting your Freshman 102 Seminar. Also, the most updated scheduling information is available via SOLAR for these classes.


Alison Feit
Department: Technology and Society

LDS 102.1: 21 Century Work and Professional Relationships- Online and Off"

Day/Time: Tuesday | 10:00AM-11:50AM
Location: ITS Center A04
Meeting Pattern: 2 hours/week for 7 weeks (January 23 to March 10)

Course Description: This course will explore the nature of connection and relationship in a world that is increasingly utilizing online mediums in establishing romantic relationships, as well as business relationships We will examine the history of how trust and intimacy are formed and will re-examine these long-held beliefs in the context of contemporary intimate and business life where interpersonal trust between individuals is often established purely in non face-to-face interactions.


Alison Feit
Department: Technology and Society

LDS 102.2: 21 Century Work and Professional Relationships- Online and Off"

Day/Time: Tuesday | 1:00PM-2:50PM
Location: ITS Center A04
Meeting Pattern: 2 hours/week for 7 weeks (January 23 to March 10)

Course Description: This course will explore the nature of connection and relationship in a world that is increasingly utilizing online mediums in establishing romantic relationships, as well as business relationships We will examine the history of how trust and intimacy are formed and will re-examine these long-held beliefs in the context of contemporary intimate and business life where interpersonal trust between individuals is often established purely in non face-to-face interactions.


Kevin Moriarty
Department: Technology and Society

LDS 102.3: Management and Leadership

Day/Time: Thursday | 8:30AM-9:50AM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This section of freshmen seminar will research management and leadership activities in history and present time. As well as current events in Leadership within the country and throughout the world. The topics will include; - The areas of Leadership in America, - An assessment of the affects of new government (regulations, laws and policies), in our society. - The management of high tech industry (specifications, & standards)or businesses (patents, trade secrets & licenses). Key Leaders will be fully reviewed and discussed during class meetings / lecture. Specific leaders from the past and today will then be chosen for the class. A number of key leaders (at least 10, e.g. George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Jack Welch, Lee Iacocca, etc) will be discussed in depth during the course. The class will conduct in depth discussion on these leaders during class meeting / lecture. The student will then be required to choose two leaders and write a brief paper and/or give a presentation on their; - their readings - their interpretation of the class discussions, - their research/investigation The students will be required to investigate two key leaders (one from Industry & one from Government or Military) and write a brief report on the significance of the leader contribution to society.


Marypat Taveras
Department: Technology and Society

LDS 102.4: Ethics

Day/Time: Wednesday | 2:30PM-3:50PM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: Individuals and organizations must make ethical decisions in the course of scientific and engineering endeavors. Various concepts have been developed related to moral conduct, character, ideals, and relationships between people, organizations, and societies, and these concepts relate to how we resolve our ethical issues.


Charles Haddad
Department: Journalism

LDS 102.5: Current Events made Interesting

Day/Time: Thursday | 4:00PM-5:20PM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: Why is the job market so terrible for new graduates; why has the value of a college education plateaued and why does China present such a formidable challenge to the U.S.? These represent a few of the most pressing questions of our time that this class will explain and make such news interesting. The goal of this class is to give students a deep understanding of some the key people, places and events that will loom large in their lifetime. In short, this is the social studies class that you can not only stay awake in. You'll look forward to attending.


Charles Robbins
Department: Social Welfare

LDS 102.6: HeForShe: The New Sustainable Development Goals and Gender Equality

Day/Time: Wednesday | 2:30PM-3:23PM
Location: Melville Library N3090
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: In September 2015 the United Nations adopted a new set of global goals designed to end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure prosperity for all as a part of the new Sustainable Development Agenda. This seminar will discuss and analyze the seventeen Sustainable Development Goals with a primary emphasis on Goal 5 Gender Equality. We will utilize Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide by Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn as our primary text and a guide to the current global situation for women, gender equality and what can be done to address the situation.


Jonathan Friedman
Department: Journalism

LDS 102.7: How Leaders Define Success

Day/Time: Tuesday | 1:00PM-2:20PM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: Accomplished men and women may define their successes and contributions in many ways. By reading about and discussing what they have to say, we can gain insights that can prove invaluable in our own work and help us to become successful ourselves. We will read the interviews with Chief Executive Officers that appear in the Business Section of the Sunday New York Times as a lead into our discussions.


Jonathan Friedman
Department: Journalism

LDS 102.8: Cultural Politics of Diversity

Day/Time: Thursday | 1:00PM-2:20PM
Location: Melville Library N3090
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course will examine the many ways that diversity touches all of our lives, regardless of race ethnicity, name, religion, gender, sexuality, political and social views, family background and other components that make us who we are -- and how our family members, friends, classmates and colleagues identify us. We will discuss these elements both in our daily lives and how we consider the world at large. This class will be lively and topical. The instructor expects the students to contribute to the class by actively joining discussions.


Nicole Leavey
Department: Technology and Society

LDS 102.9: Gender in STEM Education and Careers

Day/Time: Tuesday | 4:00PM-5:20PM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course explores gender issues penetrating K-12 environments, higher education and the STEM workforce. The course will navigate through literature (both academic and popular media) to expose students to a range of important matters. Some topics include: how gender factors into undergraduate and graduate education, the intersectionality of race and gender, gender in academia and gender and the STEM workforce. Seminal work in these area are presented and important themes are discussed.


Nicole Leavey
Department: Technology and Society

LDS 102.10: Gender in STEM Education and Careers

Day/Time: Thursday | 5:30PM-6:50PM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course explores gender issues penetrating K-12 environments, higher education and the STEM workforce. The course will navigate through literature (both academic and popular media) to expose students to a range of important matters. Some topics include: how gender factors into undergraduate and graduate education, the intersectionality of race and gender, gender in academia and gender and the STEM workforce. Seminal work in these area are presented and important themes are discussed.


Ken Lindblom
Department: English

LDS 102.11: The Language of Social Justice

Day/Time: Thursday | 11:30AM-12:23PM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: How do people really talk about issues of social justice? What words and arguments do people make that move social justice forward, and what words and arguments do people use that go nowhere? How do people use language to impede the efforts of those who seek to push for social justice? In this section of 102 we will examine newspapers, popular blogs, news shows, radio shows/podcasts, Twitter feeds, and Facebook posts to explore how people really talk about social justice and what works and what doesn’t. We will explore topics in sexual identity, race/racialization, economic class, such as the work of Black Lives Matter, Blue Lives Matter, Feminisms, LGBTQ advocacy, dismantling of the School-to-Prison Pipeline, and other topics of interests to the students in this course. This will be an active class with readings, in-depth group discussions, short presentations, and short writing assignments. Students will leave with a better sense of how language (including logic and emotion) can be used to further a social justice project (or shut it down).


Rick Ricioppo
Department: Journalism

LDS 102.12: Broadcast News

Day/Time: Thursday | 10:00AM-11:20AM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course will examine the different forms of broadcast news programming (local, national, cable) with the goal of identifying the strengths and weaknesses of medium. News stories of the day will be analyzed for accuracy, fairness, truth, worth, sensationalism, bias and effect. Discussions will include the editorial decisions that dictate what is seen on the air as well as practical and business decisions that impact today's television news industry. Students are expected to stay informed about current events and to discuss in class stories that they are following.


Rick Ricioppo
Department: Journalism

LDS 102.13: Broadcast News

Day/Time: Friday | 1:00PM-2:20PM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course will examine the different forms of broadcast news programming (local, national, cable) with the goal of identifying the strengths and weaknesses of medium. News stories of the day will be analyzed for accuracy, fairness, truth, worth, sensationalism, bias and effect. Discussions will include the editorial decisions that dictate what is seen on the air as well as practical and business decisions that impact today's television news industry. Students are expected to stay informed about current events and to discuss in class stories that they are following.


Anita Aginian
Department: Political Science

LDS 102.14: Would a career in law interest you?

Day/Time: Monday | 7:00PM-8:20PM
Location: SBS N117
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: The course would lean toward what is the actual role that attorneys play in all aspects of life. Included would be topics of public service ( government, pro bono work, popular causes) to big industry (insurance, corporations and small business). The study of law itself and how the student would plan for that while in college would also be a topic. Students would be encouraged to read some actual cases, read a few Law Journal articles and encouraged to discuss what he or she has learned. Students would make a visit to local court to observe a day to day procedure. An area of law would be highlighted each week so the students can discover if a particular area interests him or her.


Zachary Dowdy
Department: Journalism

LDS 102.15: Speaking Truth to Power: American Journalists' Lives of Leadership and Public Service

Day/Time: Tuesday | 8:30AM-9:50AM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: Our seminar will look at the lives and work of selected American journalists whose reporting and analyses range across different media. We will choose as examples men and women who rose to the challenge of speaking truth to power, exemplifying the vision embodied in the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Students will have the opportunity to study their biographies, exhibit an example of their work, and present oral reports. .


Zachary Dowdy
Department: Journalism

LDS 102.16: Speaking Truth to Power: American Journalists' Lives of Leadership and Public Service

Day/Time: Tuesday | 10:00AM-11:20AM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: Our seminar will look at the lives and work of selected American journalists whose reporting and analyses range across different media. We will choose as examples men and women who rose to the challenge of speaking truth to power, exemplifying the vision embodied in the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Students will have the opportunity to study their biographies, exhibit an example of their work, and present oral reports. .


Stephen A. Shultz
Department: Journalism

LDS 102.17: Making Decisions

Day/Time: Monday | 11:30AM-12:50PM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: . Even if we don’t realize it, we make decisions throughout each and every day! Sometimes the choices are simple and we really don’t think much, if at all, about them. At other times, we are faced with situations that do not provide clear choices, even though these very decisions may have a great impact on our lives. This course in decision making will be multidisciplinary as it will examine decisions that are made regarding a variety of problems and issues as they appear in history, literature and current affairs. These examples will be used as a bridge to the decisions that students will need to make in their own lives. Participants will examine factors that play a role in decision making and be encouraged to make applications to their own lives and situations. By the end of the course, students will develop a practical guideline that will be useful both now and for the rest of their lives. Suggestions from students as to discussions and topics are additionally encouraged and welcome.


Can Ozturk
Department: Technology and Society

LDS 102.18: Introduction to International Development

Day/Time: Monday | 1:00PM-2:20PM
Location: Melville Library N3090
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course aims to introduce the basic concepts of international development and give the students a broad-based understanding of the macro issues facing the world such as poverty, environmental destruction and the challenge of achieving sustainable development. Students learn about the different ways to measure development, and the social and economic development theories since the end of Second World War. Other topics discussed in classroom include international aid, disease burden, Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations, and the impact of information technologies and mobile communication on developing countries.


Alison Feit
Department: Technology and Society

LDS 102.19: Women and Leadership- Gender in Personal and Professional Relationships

Day/Time: Tuesday | 4:00PM-5:50PM
Location: ITS Center A04
Meeting Pattern: 2 hours/week for 7 weeks (January 23 to March 10)

Course Description: This course will explore the nature of female authority in contemporary life. It begins with an overview of how gender itself is constructed both intra-personally and inter-personally. This is then followed by an examination of how gender norms are implicitly activated in personal and professional relationships. An examination of the subtleties of this process and how it curtails potential avenues for relating to others will be followed by an examination of the traditional sociocultural, symbolic and personal dimensions inherent in female authority. Course participants, regardless of gender orientation, will learn how to gain more active choice in shaping intimate relationships and how acquiring an authoritative stance within business relationships


Jason Rose
Department: Political Science

LDS 102.20: Introduction to Nuclear Weapons

Day/Time: Wednesday | 7:00PM-8:20PM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: Fewer than ten states currently have nuclear weapons, but several dozen governments have at one time or another worked to develop or considered developing nuclear weapons. A few states are believed to be doing so now, but many more have done so in the past, including one state – South Africa – that built nuclear weapons and then gave them up. Is security the reason governments decide to pursue nuclear weapons? Are there other reasons that motivate states to do so? What are the factors that influence the decision whether or not to obtain nuclear weapons? We will look at Australia and Germany in the 1950s, and many other countries. We will ask whether Kim Il-Sung started North Korea’s nuclear weapons program for the same reasons Kim Jong-Il hid it from the IAEA, and for the same reasons Kim Jong-Un keeps it today?


Robert Ettl
Department: College of Business

LDS 102.21: American Civil War Leadership Styles

Day/Time: Monday | 1:00PM-2:20PM
Location: Harriman 115
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 25 to April 8)

Course Description: The American Civil War (aka the War Between the States or the War of Northern Aggression) Leadership Styles Seminar has been developed for students interested in this crucial time in American history. The seminar will address lectures on both military and civilian leadership styles and then students will do comparisons between northern and southern generals and government officials during this time period.


Manuel London
Department: College of Business

LDS 102.22: Social Entrepreneurship

Day/Time: Wednesday | 4:00PM-4:53PM
Location: Harriman Hall 304
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: This course focuses on how to start and lead a social entrepreneurship venture for the benefit of society and as a possible source of livelihood for yourself and others. The course covers leadership characteristics of social heroes and learning from model social entrepreneurship efforts, locally and globally. You will select a cause about which you feel passionate and, as practice for developing your own leadership skills, develop a plan (following processes used for business planning), set goals, and formulate strategies for action. You will identify and develop your own initiative, not taking one that already exists. You will develop your own ideas, explore the issues associated with your initiative, and formulate a meaningful strategy which will be a first step to creating your vision – the benefits you hope to provide or produce. Your cause may be any way or means that “repairs the world”—whether related to health, social services, the economy, the environment. Your focus may be developing more caring relationships and/or compassionate services for those suffering in any way.


Joseph Topek
Department:

LDS 102.23: Religion and Society

Day/Time: Thursday | 4:00PM-4:53PM
Location: Melville Library N3090
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: An examination of how religion and religious attitudes have affected American public policy since the 18th century as well as inter-group relations and tolerance of minority religious groups.


Miryam Laifer
Department: European Languages, Literature, and Cultures

LDS 102.24: Follow the Leader (1789-1945)

Day/Time: Monday | 10:00AM-10:53AM
Location: Melville Library N3090
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: The course will focus on historical figures from France and the Francophone world from 1789 to 1945. We will look at specific moments in these societies where people have acted in the name of leadership. We will then examine how the literary world has carried out and supported their actions.


Miryam Laifer
Department: European Languages, Literature, and Cultures

LDS 102.25: Follow the Leader (1789-1945)

Day/Time: Monday | 11:00AM-11:53AM
Location: Melville Library N3090
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: The course will focus on historical figures from France and the Francophone world from 1789 to 1945. We will look at specific moments in these societies where people have acted in the name of leadership. We will then examine how the literary world has carried out and supported their actions.


Christine Veloso
Department: Technology and Society

LDS 102.26: Finding Balance in Work and Life

Day/Time: Tuesday | 5:30PM-6:23PM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 23 to May 5)

Course Description: As a student do you find yourself struggling to find that perfect combination of life and work? Does this struggle result in your feeling overwhelmed, stressed and dissatisfied with many aspects of your experiences? If so, then this course may be one resource to help you help yourself. The course's focus will be on stress and coping and it will incorporate self exploration, practicing of hands-on techniques and the development of skill sets to empower you to combat your sources of stress.


Stephen Vitkun
Department: Anesthesiology

LDS 102.27: So, You Want to go to Medical School? Graduate School? Law School? Or just Succeed in Business?

Day/Time: Thursday | 10:00AM-11:20AM
Location: HSC Seminar 1B
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)

Course Description: This course will help students to understand and use the necessary tools to have a competitive application to graduate education whether it be Medical School, Graduate School, Law School or other type of graduate program. The classes will focus on the details of building a resume (CV), a personal statement and the interview process. It will also include a session on learning styles which may be helpful to students who have an increased work load as they transition from high school to college studies. There will also be a session devoted more specifically to health care careers but much of the material will also relate to non-health care related graduate or other programs.


Jason Rose
Department: Political Science

LDS 102.28: Leadership Through Sailing

Day/Time: Wednesday | 5:30PM-6:50PM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 10 weeks (January 23 to April 7)
Special Notes: NOTE: This seminar includes both classroom sessions and on-water sessions. No prior sailing experience is necessary. All classroom sessions are held during regularly scheduled class times. On-water sessions will be determined according to students' individual scheduling needs. All students MUST attend a minimum of 5 on-water sailing sessions to pass the course. More details will be given in the first classroom session. This course is taught by Professor Jason Rose, who is also the SBU Sailing Program Director. On-water sessions will be facilitated by SBU Sailing Team Head Coach, Geoffrey Loffredo.

Course Description: Sailing is a metaphor for life. The lessons of simple seamanship have universal applications. This course will give a brief overview of the history of great leaders who were/are also sailors from John Paul Jones to the founder of CNN, Ted Turner to Oracle Chairman, Larry Ellison to Laura Dekker, the youngest woman to sail around the world at 16 years old. The first half of the course takes place in the classroom. The second half of the course takes place at the Stony Brook University Sailing Team facilities at the Port Jefferson Yacht Club where you will learn the basics of sailing and how it builds teamwork, humility, respect and understanding for your colleagues and of nature. Most important, you will learn about your own character. This course is taught by the SBU Sailing Program Director, Jason Rose and the SBU Sailing Team Head Coach, Geoffrey Loffredo.