102 Courses

+ What are the 102 Seminars?

Freshman 102 Seminars offer first- year students the opportunity to work with experienced faculty who are passionate and knowledgeable about the seminar topic. 102 seminars are introductory in the sense that little prior background is expected, yet they are real inquiries into the methods, components, and substance of a particular subject. In addition to developing meaningful bonds with faculty and peers, 102 seminars provide an intellectually exciting way of transitioning to the university. The learning outcomes for the Freshman 102 seminars are:

  • Improve critical thinking by developing evaluative, problem-solving, and expressive skills.
  • Enhance group communication skills through discussions, small-group work, presentations or debates.
  • Develop intellectual curiosity and better understand the role of a student in an academic community.

+ How to choose your 102 Seminar:

Although timing and your overall course schedule will influence your choice of seminars, you should use this class as an opportunity to develop your overall academic experience. When you register for your 102 seminar, you should consider a few things:

  • What are your academic interests?
  • Would you like to meet faculty from a specific academic discipline?
  • Do any of the seminar topics align with your research or career goals?
  • Do any of the seminar topics intrigue you?
  • Use this as an opportunity to explore an idea or project or topic.

+ What to expect from your 102 Seminar:

The 102 seminars will be different than most of the other classes in your schedule.  Seminars are meant to be small and interactive. 

  • Attendance is essential to your overall success
  • You will be expected to participate in discussions with your professor and the rest of the class
  • Your discussions will be based on assigned readings, movies or activities
  • You will be expected to share your opinions and questions about the seminar content

Please consider the above recommendations when selecting your Freshman 102 Seminar. Also, the most updated scheduling information is available via SOLAR for these classes.


Steve Marsh
Department: Theatre Arts

ACH 102.1: Script Development and Play Reading Workshop

Day/Time: Monday | 11:00AM - 12:50PM
Location: Tabler Center Blackbox (110)
Meeting Pattern: 2 hours / week for 7 weeks ( January 27 to March 14)
Special Notes: This class cannot be added after the first week of classes.

Course Description: What is important to you and how can you express those ideas in dramatic form? Students will learn that there are many different dramatic forms through which ideas may be expressed. In this seminar we will pay special attention to the 10-Minute play format, which has become a staple of many regional theatre and playwriting organizations around the country. All students who participate in this workshop will share their ideas through writing plays.


Elizabeth Bojsza
Department: Theatre Arts

ACH 102.2: Public Speaking and Presentation

Day/Time: Tuesday | 2:30PM-3:23PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 27 to May 9)

Course Description: This course will give the student practical experience and training in delivering prepared speeches as well as explore communication skills in interviewing and other less formal situations.


Jessica Calvanico
Department: Theatre Arts

ACH 102.3: Performing Gender and Sexuality

Day/Time: Monday | 2:30PM-3:50PM
Location: Melville Library S1410
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 11 weeks (January 27 to April 18)

Course Description: This course examines gender and sexuality within a socio-cultural context, investigating this relationship through a performative lens. We will explore these concepts through texts from a wide range of disciplines including: queer theory, feminism, anthropology, performance studies, Marxism and critical theory. Together we will consider performances of gender and sexuality that include art, dance, film, music, literature, and television. As a final project, the class will create individual performances surrounding a topic of their choice.


Margaret Schedel
Department: Music

ACH 102.4: Deep Listening

Day/Time: Wednesday | 11:00AM-11:53AM
Location: Tabler Center Blackbox (110)
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 27 to May 9)

Course Description: Deep Listening® is a philosophy and practice developed by Pauline Oliveros that distinguishes the difference between the involuntary nature of hearing and the voluntary selective nature of listening. The result of the practice cultivates appreciation of sounds on a heightened level, expanding the potential for connection and interaction with one's environment, technology and performance with others in music and related arts. The practice of Deep Listening provides a framework for artistic collaboration and musical improvisation and gives composers, performers, artists of other disciplines, and audiences new tools to explore and interact with environmental and instrumental sounds. Dr. Margaret Schedel holds a certificate in Deep Listening which means she has completed three years of training (and actually did five) with the founding teachers of Deep Listening.


Theresa Tiso
Department: Physical Therapy

ACH 102.5: Food and Culture

Day/Time: Thursday | 10:00AM-11:50AM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 2 hours / week for 7 weeks ( January 27 to March 14)
Special Notes: This class cannot be added after the first week of classes.

Course Description: This seminar will investigate food as a part of culture. Topics will center on what and how we know and learn about the food we eat and drink. Where does our food come from? How do we grow, transport, package, prepare, cook, and eat food? Why is food a consumer commodity? How can we make sense of the tremendous variety in food patterns across the lifespan in families, cultures, and institutions, both in public and private settings? What is the difference between nutrition and food and why do we care? What is the role of food in our personal health, disease prevention, and wellness lifestyle? Participants will discuss these and other topics through weekly critiques of the readings, presentations, and video critiques.


James McKenna
Department: Hispanic Languages & Literatures

ACH 102.6: The Spanish Civil War (1936-39), the Franco Dictatorship (1939-75), and the emergence of modern Spanish society

Day/Time: Wednesday | 4:00PM-4:53PM
Location: Melville Library N3090
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 27 to May 9)

Course Description: A bloody Civil War (1936-39) set the course and tone for all subsequent developments in Spain. We will focus closely on Ernest Hemingway's novel, For Whom the Bell Tolls. We will also analyze subsequent developments in Spain, from the Franco Dictatorship (1939-75) to the successful transition to democracy and full membership in the European Union.


Lois Lemonda
Department: European Languages, Literatures & Cultures

ACH 102.7: Italian Culture Through The Arts

Day/Time: Wednesday | 10:00AM-10:53AM
Location: Tabler Center 104
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 27 to May 9)

Course Description: The course would divulge into various topics in Italian Culture in order to engage students in a cross-cultural discussion with an emphasis upon the arts, specifically literature and film. Students would be exposed to various facets of Italian culture through these media and would reflect upon both their own backgrounds as well as their expectations/existing knowledge of Italian culture. Students would be afforded the opportunity to examine their own cultural beliefs in the context of another, thereby enriching the overall diverse and multicultural experience at Stony Brook University.


Margarita Espada-Santos
Department: Theatre Arts

ACH 102.8: Movement for Actors

Day/Time: Friday | 9:00AM - 10:50AM
Location: Tabler Center Blackbox (110)
Meeting Pattern: 2 hours / week for 7 weeks ( January 27 to March 14)
Special Notes: This class cannot be added after the first week of classes.

Course Description: This movement class will develop from simple skeletal mobility sequences to full movement forms. Emphasis will be placed on examining how their range of motion relates to alignment, support, weight, space, times detail in the course of movement. The class will explore the body's anatomy as the basis for movement material in a full range, including neutral, character building and abstracts compositions. This course will expose the students to a various techniques designed to challenge the students physically and psychologically through such disciplines as physical theater, mime, mask and character building. Students will understand the basic principle of actor playing: the presence on stage, the significant body, and working with a partner.


Giuseppe Costa
Department: European Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

ACH 102.9: From Ammore to Zazzà: The Language and Culture of Naples

Day/Time: Friday | 12:00PM - 12:53PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 27 to May 9)

Course Description: Naples is one of the most controversial cities in the world; it is the land of the most powerful crime organization in Europe: the Camorra; but it is also an historical symbol of music and art. With the help of different media and technology we will be able to study its culture and its language and we will discover the most iconic aspects of the city as we immerse ourselves in its streets and alleys.


Giuseppe Costa
Department: European Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

ACH 102.10: Camorra: Europe's Bloodiest Mafia

Day/Time: Monday | 12:00PM-12:53PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 27 to May 9)

Course Description: Naples, Italy is one of the most controversial cities in the world; it is the land of the most powerful crime organization in Italy: the Camorra. With the help of various media we will analyze the historical and cultural roots of the oldest form of organized crime in Italy.


Sini Sanou
Department: European Languages, Literatures & Cultures

ACH 102.11: Francophone African Diaspora: Politics and Protest through Music

Day/Time: Wednesday | 7:00PM-8:50PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 2 hours / week for 7 weeks ( January 27 to March 14)
Special Notes: This class cannot be added after the first week of classes.

Course Description: An introduction to Francophone African Diaspora through rebel and protest music. The course focuses on how “la musique engagée” from the Francophone African diaspora reflects attitudes towards destiny, life and death, and becomes a site of resistance to multiple systems of oppression. Revolutionary movements in France and in the Francophone African World (decolonization, liberation struggles, resistance, “altermondialisme”, and empowerment) are addressed through rebel songs from France and the Francophone African Diaspora. Students will have an understanding of the clashes between art, government, and the culture of political/social activism by studying radical/protest musical responses to key event in the history of France and the Francophone African World.


Lois Lemonda
Department: European Languages, Literatures & Cultures

ACH 102.12: Italian Culture Through The Arts

Day/Time: Tuesday | 5:30PM-6:50PM
Location: Humanities Building 3020
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 11 weeks (January 27 to April 18)

Course Description: The course would divulge into various topics in Italian Culture in order to engage students in a cross-cultural discussion with an emphasis upon the arts, specifically literature and film. Students would be exposed to various facets of Italian culture through these media and would reflect upon both their own backgrounds as well as their expectations/existing knowledge of Italian culture. Students would be afforded the opportunity to examine their own cultural beliefs in the context of another, thereby enriching the overall diverse and multicultural experience at Stony Brook University.


Clyde Miller
Department: Philosophy

ACH 102.13: Homer's Odyssey

Day/Time: Wednesday | 12:00PM-12:53PM
Location: Tabler Center 104
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour / week for 14 weeks (January 27 to May 9)

Course Description: Students will read Homer's Odyssey in translation and examine film, comic book, and art interpretations to compare and enrich seeing and reading. Students will prepare answers to questions to discuss in groups each session. They will become acquainted with one of the classic heroes of Western literature and ideas. They will reflect on the ways in which Odysseus' desire and efforts to return home are to be found in contemporary life and experience and write at least two brief essays on the connections between Odysseus and themselves.


Ruth Kisch
Department: School of Professional Development

ACH 102.14: Telling A Story with Pictures: The Art of Comics

Day/Time: Wednesday | 2:30PM-3:50PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 11 weeks (January 27 to April 18)

Course Description: Students will read two graphic novels, one from the manga tradition and one from the superhero genre. They will analyze and discuss the ways in which the images and words are combined . They will write at least two brief essays on the visual and narrative choices made by the creators of these two books.


Ruth Kisch
Department: School of Professional Development

ACH 102.15: Telling A Story with Pictures: The Art of Comics

Day/Time: Thursday | 11:30AM-12:50PM
Location: Tabler Center 104
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 11 weeks (January 27 to April 18)

Course Description: Students will read two graphic novels, one from the manga tradition and one from the superhero genre. They will analyze and discuss the ways in which the images and words are combined . They will write at least two brief essays on the visual and narrative choices made by the creators of these two books.


Robert Chase
Department: History

ACH 102.16: Social Justice and Social Movements in the 20th Century

Day/Time: Tuesday | 10:00AM-10:53AM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 27 to May 9)

Course Description: The course will define "social justice" broadly by introducing students to the latest scholarship on the Civil Right Movement, particularly recent articles and monographs that move past the traditional celebrative narrative and examine instead contentious issues of race, and the ways in which the Civil Rights Movement shaped conceptions of national identity, public memory, culture, sexuality, and gender. In addition to learning some of the latest historiographic approaches to the study of the Civil Rights Movement, students will learn particular historical skills: how to differentiate between primary and secondary sources; how to identify and critique arguments in secondary works; how to read and analyze texts; how to conduct and document research; how to create a historical argument and interpretation using primary evidence; and how to present that argument in a clear and coherent historical prose.


Eric Haralson
Department: English

ACH 102.17: Gertrude Stein and the Lost Generation

Day/Time: Thursday | 1:00PM-2:20PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 minutes / week for 11 weeks (January 27 to April 18)

Course Description: The course will consider selected works by Stein--poetry, fiction, essays, and autobiography-to illuminate the excitement, innovation, and complexity of transatlantic cultural life between the World Wars. Short writings by Hemingway and Fitzgerald, as well as artworks by Picasso and Matisse, will round out this portrait of what Stein labeled "the lost generation."


Aruna Sharma
Department: Asian and American Studies

ACH 102.19: Introduction to Indian Music and its influence on Bollywood Cinema(1950-1970)

Day/Time: Friday | 2:30PM-3:50PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 minutes / week for 11 weeks (January 27 to April 18)

Course Description: Basic elements of Indian Classical Music,such as the Raga music, Tala (Time Measure), different schools or Gharanas, classical forms such as Dhrupad, Khayal, Thumri,and Tharana are studied through the analysis of historical and contemporary masterpieces. The role of specific stringed and instruments, such as Tanpura and Tabla is studied. The intimate relationship between music, religion and ethnicity, especially in liturgical and popular music. Students will learn learn to listen critically. Influence of classical music on film music will be analyzed through listening and watching clips of certain classics.


Philip Baldwin
Department: Theatre Arts

ACH 102.20: The Telepresent Self

Day/Time: Tuesday | 7:00PM-8:50PM
Location: Tabler Center 105
Meeting Pattern: 2 hours / week for 7 weeks (January 27 to March 14)
Special Notes: This class cannot be added after the first week of classes.

Course Description: Who are we online? Who are we 'broadcasting' to from our smartphones? What is the 'glue of the self' when we feel pulled from every direction? Texting while driving has become the leading cause of traffic accidents. Why? This is a course that explores the self using a number of open source software, wild interfaces, and social media sites. Design the zero-distance space! The university of the future. Critically look at the construction of your 'self' on all your social media sites! Add as many human-computer interface devices as possible. We will play with the Kinect and the Neuro-sensor cap to have gesture and emotion move motors, film, and sound!


Jeanette Yew
Department: Theatre Arts

ACH 102.21: "Modern Prometheus: an exploration of the uncanny"

Day/Time: Monday | 4:00PM-5:50PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 2 hours / week for 7 weeks (January 27 to March 14)
Special Notes: This class cannot be added after the first week of classes.

Course Description: An exploration of the Uncanny through readings, films, puppetry and using video and sound technology. The class will cumulate to a public presentation on March 4th. Students will learn the concept of the Uncanny through readings and viewing examples from movies to visual arts. This concept is also closely connected to the performing art form, puppetry. Using Mary Shelley's Frankenstein as the base, in the class we will apply the concept to create a presentation using puppetry and video and sound technology.