102 Courses

+ What are the 102 Seminars?

First-year student 102 Seminars offer first- year students the opportunity to work with experienced faculty who are passionate and knowledgeable about the seminar topic. 102 seminars are introductory in the sense that little prior background is expected, yet they are real inquiries into the methods, components, and substance of a particular subject. In addition to developing meaningful bonds with faculty and peers, 102 seminars provide an intellectually exciting way of transitioning to the university. The learning outcomes for the First-year student 102 seminars are:

  • Improve critical thinking by developing evaluative, problem-solving, and expressive skills.
  • Enhance group communication skills through discussions, small-group work, presentations or debates.
  • Develop intellectual curiosity and better understand the role of a student in an academic community.

+ How to choose your 102 Seminar:

Although timing and your overall course schedule will influence your choice of seminars, you should use this class as an opportunity to develop your overall academic experience. When you register for your 102 seminar, you should consider a few things:

  • What are your academic interests?
  • Would you like to meet faculty from a specific academic discipline?
  • Do any of the seminar topics align with your research or career goals?
  • Do any of the seminar topics intrigue you?
  • Use this as an opportunity to explore an idea or project or topic.

+ What to expect from your 102 Seminar:

The 102 seminars will be different than most of the other classes in your schedule.  Seminars are meant to be small and interactive. 

  • Attendance is essential to your overall success
  • You will be expected to participate in discussions with your professor and the rest of the class
  • Your discussions will be based on assigned readings, movies or activities
  • You will be expected to share your opinions and questions about the seminar content

Please consider the above recommendations when selecting your First-year student 102 Seminar. Also, the most updated scheduling information is available via SOLAR for these classes.


Steve Marsh
Department: Theater Arts

ACH 102.1: Script Development and Play Reading Workshop

Day/Time: Wednesday | 9:00AM-9:53AM
Location: Tabler Center Blackbox (110)
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 26 to May 8)

Course Description: What is important to you and how can you express those ideas in dramatic form? Students will learn that there are many different dramatic forms through which ideas may be expressed. In this seminar we will pay special attention to the 10-Minute play format, which has become a staple of many regional theatre and playwriting organizations around the country. All students who participate in this workshop will share their ideas through writing plays.


Patrice Nganang
Department: Cultural Analysis and Theory

ACH 102.2: How I Write My Novels

Day/Time: Wednesday | 2:30PM-3:50PM
Location: Tabler Center 104
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 11 weeks (January 26 to April 17 )

Course Description: During this class, the students will learn to write a novel, by writing a novel. In the process, they will hot how to use their imagination collectively, how to construct characters, and set a story. Writing skills will be acquired, as well as the capacity to work in groups.


Eduardo Mendieta
Department: Philosophy

ACH 102.3: Homer's Iliad

Day/Time: Wednesday | 5:30PM-6:50PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 11 weeks (January 26 to April 17 )

Course Description: This seminar will be devoted to a philosophical reading of what is considered by most humanists, the first classic of Western literature. We will pay attention to key myths and philosophical ideas.


Margaret Schedel
Department: Music

ACH 102.4: Deep Listening

Day/Time: Tuesday | 1:00PM-1:53PM
Location: Tabler Center Blackbox (110)
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 26 to May 8)

Course Description: Deep Listening® is a philosophy and practice developed by Pauline Oliveros that distinguishes the difference between the involuntary nature of hearing and the voluntary selective nature of listening. The result of the practice cultivates appreciation of sounds on a heightened level, expanding the potential for connection and interaction with one's environment, technology and performance with others in music and related arts. The practice of Deep Listening provides a framework for artistic collaboration and musical improvisation and gives composers, performers, artists of other disciplines, and audiences new tools to explore and interact with environmental and instrumental sounds. Dr. Margaret Schedel holds a certificate in Deep Listening which means she has completed three years of training (and actually did five) with the founding teachers of Deep Listening.


Theresa Tiso
Department: Physical Therapy

ACH 102.5: Food and Culture

Day/Time: Thursday | 10:00AM-11:20AM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 11 weeks (January 26 to April 17 )

Course Description: This seminar will investigate food as a part of culture. Topics will center on what and how we know and learn about the food we eat and drink. Where does our food come from? How do we grow, transport, package, prepare, cook, and eat food? Why is food a consumer commodity? How can we make sense of the tremendous variety in food patterns across the lifespan in families, cultures, and institutions, both in public and private settings? What is the difference between nutrition and food and why do we care? What is the role of food in our personal health, disease prevention, and wellness lifestyle? Participants will discuss these and other topics through weekly critiques of the readings, presentations, and video critiques.


Lauren Kaushansky
Department: History

ACH 102.6: The Complete Persepolis: A Catalyst for Conversation

Day/Time: Thursday | 1:00PM-2:20PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 11 weeks (January 26 to April 17 )

Course Description: Using the graphic novel, The Complete Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi, we will explore art, memoir, culture, community, and politics to better understand some of the boundaries, identities and biases we carry. This coming of age story about a young girl in Iran during the Islamic revolution (starting in 1979) will act as our springboard. Ultimately our goal will be to use literature as a catalyst for conversation, collaboration and community building.


E.K. Tan
Department: Cultural Analysis and Theory

ACH 102.7: Film Documentary

Day/Time: Wednesday | 8:30AM-9:50AM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 11 weeks (January 26 to April 17 )

Course Description: This course is an introduction to the film documentary. By contextualizing the development and analyzing the narrative conventions of the genre, we will explore thematic and theoretical issues relating to spectatorship, race, gender, class, and social relations in documentaries. We will also investigate how documentary films represent and depict reality; how different sets of ideology are embedded in their narratives; and how they use rhetorical tools to engage the audience.


Margarita Espada
Department: Theater Arts

ACH 102.8: Movement for Actors

Day/Time: Friday | 1:00PM-2:20PM
Location: Tabler Center Blackbox (110)
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 11 weeks (January 26 to April 17 )

Course Description: This movement class will develop from simple skeletal mobility sequences to full movement forms. Emphasis will be placed on examining how their range of motion relates to alignment, support, weight, space, times detail in the course of movement. The class will explore the body's anatomy as the basis for movement material in a full range, including neutral, character building and abstracts compositions. This course will expose the students to a various techniques designed to challenge the students physically and psychologically through such disciplines as physical theater, mime, mask and character building. Students will understand the basic principle of actor playing: the presence on stage, the significant body, and working with a partner.


Daniel Weymouth
Department: Music

ACH 102.9: Did You Hear That? – Sonic Art Using Computers

Day/Time: Friday | 2:30PM-3:23PM
Location: Staller Center 4255
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour / week for 14 weeks (January 26 to May 8)

Course Description: Computer music, electronic music, sound design. By any name, recent years have seen an explosion of creative activities in computer-aided sonic art. Be a part of it! Learn about acoustics, hard-disk recording, mixing and editing, sound manipulation, digital sound effects, and composition with sound. Listen to and discuss the best pieces from this growing area of music. Explore the microscopic inside of a sound. Under the friendly guidance of internationally known composer Dr. Daniel Weymouth, you will discover a new way of hearing, and of approaching sound. And, you will create! This is a project-based course: the end of the course will be a concert featuring pieces you all have created, using widely available freeware. No prior musical experience is required, just an interest in sound! Basic computer literacy (nothing fancy) is assumed. Students will need to have access to a computer on which they can install freeware.


Gregory Ruf
Department: Cultural Analysis and Theory

ACH 102.10: Ethnography

Day/Time: Tuesday | 10:00AM-11:20AM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 11 weeks (January 26 to April 17 )

Course Description: How do can one interpret and understand a foreign culture? What is it like to do long-term field research in another culture? This course offers an introduction to the techniques and challenges of participant-observation used by cultural anthropologists to conduct ethnographic research.


Sini Sanou
Department: European Languages, Literature, and Cultures

ACH 102.11: Francophone African Diaspora: Politics and Protest through Music

Day/Time: Wednesday | 7:00PM-8:20PM
Location: Humanities Building 1057
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 11 weeks (January 26 to April 17 )

Course Description: An introduction to Francophone African Diaspora through rebel and protest music. The course focuses on how “la musique engagée” from the Francophone African diaspora reflects attitudes towards destiny, life and death, and becomes a site of resistance to multiple systems of oppression. Revolutionary movements in France and in the Francophone African World (decolonization, liberation struggles, resistance, “altermondialisme”, and empowerment) are addressed through rebel songs from France and the Francophone African Diaspora. Students will have an understanding of the clashes between art, government, and the culture of political/social activism by studying radical/protest musical responses to key event in the history of France and the Francophone African World.


Lois Lemonda
Department: European Languages, Literature, and Cultures

ACH 102.12: Italian Culture Through The Arts

Day/Time: Saturday | 10:00AM-11:20AM
Location: Melville Library 4340
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 11 weeks (January 26 to April 17 )

Course Description: The course would divulge into various topics in Italian Culture in order to engage students in a cross-cultural discussion with an emphasis upon the arts, specifically literature and film. Students would be exposed to various facets of Italian culture through these media and would reflect upon both their own backgrounds as well as their expectations/existing knowledge of Italian culture. Students would be afforded the opportunity to examine their own cultural beliefs in the context of another, thereby enriching the overall diverse and multicultural experience at Stony Brook University.


Clyde Miller
Department: Philosophy

ACH 102.13: Homer's Odyssey

Day/Time: Wednesday | 12:00PM-12:53PM
Location: Tabler Center 104
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour / week for 14 weeks (January 26 to May 8)

Course Description: Students will read Homer's Odyssey in translation and examine film, comic book, and art interpretations to compare and enrich seeing and reading. Students will prepare answers to questions to discuss in groups each session. They will become acquainted with one of the classic heroes of Western literature and ideas. They will reflect on the ways in which Odysseus' desire and efforts to return home are to be found in contemporary life and experience and write at least two brief essays on the connections between Odysseus and themselves.


Ruth Kisch
Department: School of Professional Development

ACH 102.14: Telling A Story with Pictures: The Art of Comics

Day/Time: Wednesday | 2:30PM-3:50PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 11 weeks (January 26 to April 17 )

Course Description: Students will read two graphic novels, one from the manga tradition and one from the superhero genre. They will analyze and discuss the ways in which the images and words are combined . They will write at least two brief essays on the visual and narrative choices made by the creators of these two books.


Ruth Kisch
Department: School of Professional Development

ACH 102.15: Telling A Story with Pictures: The Art of Comics

Day/Time: Thursday | 11:30AM-12:50PM
Location: Tabler Center 104
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 11 weeks (January 26 to April 17 )

Course Description: Students will read two graphic novels, one from the manga tradition and one from the superhero genre. They will analyze and discuss the ways in which the images and words are combined . They will write at least two brief essays on the visual and narrative choices made by the creators of these two books.


Tracey Walters
Department: Africana Studies

ACH 102.16: Is Beyonce a Terrorist: Race and the Representation of the Black Female Body

Day/Time: Tuesday | 8:30AM-10:20AM
Location: Tabler Center 104
Meeting Pattern: 2 hours / week for 7 weeks (January 26 to March 13)

Course Description: Race and Representation: The Black Body in Media, Literature, and the Arts builds upon current conversations about the racialized and hyper-sexualized image of black female bodies in pop culture and how they are represented in the national imaginary. Feminist readings and cultural criticism show that racing and sexing the Black body has had significant consequences for the Black community. Pop icons like Beyonce and Nicki Minaj, along with celebrities from television shows, and unknown figures represented in visual art and media, serve as examples of how black women embrace their sexuality and promote sexual empowerment. Some argue that these women contribute to the denigrating image of the Black female body that promote the racist and sexist discourses that negatively impact the Black community. An important question for consideration is: are these women self-exploitative or sexually liberated?


Timothy Hyde
Department: Philosophy

ACH 102.17: Death

Day/Time: Thursday | 11:30AM-12:50PM
Location: Harriman Hall 218
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 11 weeks (January 26 to April 17 )

Course Description: Death and taxes, the two unavoidable elements of life. Most of us have some idea about how taxes work, but how about death? This course examines the meaning of death and, of course, co-relatively the meaning of life. Along the way, will ask about the role that thinking about these questions plays–especially the kind of thinking that happens at university. Oh yes, and we’ll watch one movie.


Kristina Lucenko
Department: Program of Writing and Rhetoric

ACH 102.18: Life Narrative: Theory and Practice

Day/Time: Monday | 1:00PM-2:20PM
Location: Humanities Building 2030
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 11 weeks (January 26 to April 17 )

Course Description: Life narrative is informed by memory, identity, history, experience, agency, place, subjectivity, among other factors. In this introduction to life narrative, students will examine texts that explore a range of subjects and textual-visual-verbal-virtual modes. Student will contribute to a course blog and create a final multimodal project.


Aruna Sharma
Department: Asian and American Studies

ACH 102.19: Introduction to Indian Music and its influence on Bollywood Cinema

Day/Time: Thursday | 5:30PM-6:23PM
Location: Humanities Building 2047
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 26 to May 8)

Course Description: Basic Elements of Indian Classical Music, such as the Raga music, Tala (Time Measure), different schools or Gharanas, classical forms such as Dhrupad, Khayal and Thumri are studied through the analysis of historical and contemporary masterpieces. The role of specific stringed and percussion instruments such as Tanpura and Tabla is studied. The intimate relationship exists between music, religion and ethnicity, especially in liturgical and popular music. A key ingredient of the phenomenal impact of Hindi Cinema (Bollywood) has been its rich and vibrant music. This course explores the classical foundation of popular Hindi film songs of the 20th century, 1950 to 1970. Using videos and audio samples of the great classics and masterpieces students will learn to identify and appreciate basic elements of Indian Classical Music


Philip Baldwin
Department: Theater Arts

ACH 102.20: The Telepresent Self

Day/Time: Tuesday | 7:00PM-8:20PM
Location: Tabler Center 105
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 11 weeks (January 26 to April 17 )

Course Description: 1. Who, what, why, where, when, how, how much are you? Gather images of your grandparents and parents. Doctor them in Photoshop and ‘cartoonize’ programs. Start collective blog. Get/expand face book, flicker, you tube, second life, twitter, sketchup warehouse, and other select social media sites. Pose on some of these as another gender, race, class, nationality, or ghost/spirit/vampire/etc. Start comic life or comic book maker. Start your graphic novel. Collective topic: Vitalism contra Materialism. Keep a sketchbook. Open source software to download and to use: comic life, cartoonize, comic book creator, onyx, audacity, sketchup, blender, processing, open cobalt, open office, pure data, gimp, imovie, windows media maker, audacity, gamer, drammatica, and others.


Jeanette Yew
Department: Theater Arts

ACH 102.21: "Modern Prometheus: an exploration of the uncanny"

Day/Time: Tuesday | 1:00PM-2:20PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 11 weeks (January 26 to April 17 )

Course Description: An exploration of the Uncanny through readings, films, puppetry and using video and sound technology. The class will cumulate to a public presentation on March 4th. Students will learn the concept of the Uncanny through readings and viewing examples from movies to visual arts. This concept is also closely connected to the performing art form, puppetry. Using Mary Shelley's Frankenstein as the base, in the class we will apply the concept to create a presentation using puppetry and video and sound technology.


Chuck Powell
Department: Other

ACH 102.22: Storytelling Through Music

Day/Time: Monday | 2:30PM-3:23PM
Location: Melville Library S1410D
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour / week for 14 weeks (January 26 to May 8)

Course Description: Music is an incredibly powerful way to convey a message or to tell a story. The combination of the melody and the lyrics or either in and of itself can be amazing. Musical story telling is as old as civilization and as new as the latest release by your favorite artist. In general, there’s no topic I like to discuss with students more than music. This seminar will explore music as story-telling. You can expect to spend a lot of time listening to a wide selection of stories I will choose and you will have plenty of opportunity to choose your own as well. There will be very little reading per se but you will be expected to write frequent short pieces that reflect on what you/we have been listening to. From the narrative qualities of jazz and classical music to the poetry of rap music, students will learn a great deal about communicating a message using music.


Jessica Karbowiak
Department: Program of Writing and Rhetoric

ACH 102.23: Memoir Writing: Finding Your Natural Writing Voice

Day/Time: Monday | 11:00AM-11:53AM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 26 to May 8)

Course Description: The challenge if you are willing to accept it: tap into your own natural writing voice! You do not need to be the next Hemingway to enjoy this class... This class is designed to help freshmen writers at various levels of ability get more in tune with their Writing Voices, or personalities on the page. This will be helpful for young academics in any field--not just creative writers! This class will focus on short readings and discussions, and students will also have the opportunity to try their hands at memoir by writing their own short, personal essays.


Jessica Karbowiak
Department: Program of Writing and Rhetoric

ACH 102.24: Ekphrasis: Reading the Visual Image

Day/Time: Monday | 12:00PM-12:53PM
Location: Tabler Center 107
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour/ week for 14 weeks (January 26 to May 8)

Course Description: Do you love paintings? Do you like to write or read poetry? Though creative writers can find reasons for writing anywhere, this particular class will rely heavily on the study of The Visual Image (think paintings and photography) as catalyst for invention, imagination, and intuition for student writing. Students will get the chance to discuss some famous (and not-so-famous) examples of Ekphrastic poetry--poetry about paintings--and the artwork that served as inspirational. Students will also get to try their hand at writing a series of ekphrastic poems of their own.


Lori Repetti
Department: Linguistics

ACH 102.25: Endangered Languages

Day/Time: Monday | 2:30PM-3:50PM
Location: SBS N110
Meeting Pattern: 1 hour 20 mins/ week for 11 weeks (January 26 to April 17 )

Course Description: We are faced with a major crisis affecting humanity: within the next century about 60-80% of the estimated 6000 languages spoken today will become extinct. UNESCO claims that nearly half of the world’s languages fall into one of the following four categories of endangerment – unsafe, definitely endangered, severely endangered, critically endangered – and that more than 200 languages have disappeared within the past 3 generations. In this course we will explore this phenomenon from various perspectives, and address the following questions: What is language loss? Why should we care if a language becomes extinct? What role do political and economic factors play? What is language maintenance? Is language revitalization possible?